As if someone had just opened a window…

Earlier this month while going through the daily ritual of reading my mail, I found a brown campus envelope. Inside was a book titled Before We Visit the Goddess, by Chitra Bannerjee Divakaruni. As I held the book in my hands, I felt the sudden gush of cool air, as if someone had just opened a window. The feeling was familiar, for I have known it since my childhood.

Growing up in a small town in India without television or the Internet, I had limited opportunities for exposure to the outside world. Books and magazines, carefully selected and mail-ordered by my parents, were the only introduction to the magical world that lay outside 3-mile radius of our town. Each month, I waited eagerly for the arrival of the postman who brought these books neatly wrapped in brown envelopes. The time between these deliveries was filled in by magazines, unceremoniously slipped through the crack in the door by the newspaper delivery man.

As much as I loved magazines, the books brought me the most joy. Stories, poems, novels—I read them all and then reread them until the characters became a part of my world. I remember tearing open the envelopes, holding the books in my hands, staring at the covers and feeling lost in anticipation of what lay inside. The sensation was … exhilarating. Every time, it was like the gush of cool air as if someone had just opened a window.

Those books were my window to the world, a world that was outside of my reach, a world that was more a mystery than reality to me, but a world I very much wanted to be a part of.

Now, standing in my office and holding the proof copy of Chitra’s latest novel, I was feeling the same exhilaration. As an avid reader of fiction written by Indian-American authors, I have followed Chitra’s writings since 1995 when her first collection of short stories, Arranged Marriages, was published. I knew Chitra before she ever knew me.

Almost nine years ago, I received my first correspondence from Chitra. I had just been appointed president of the University of Houston and was taking a few weeks off before formally undertaking the new position. In preparation for the impending leisure travel, I stopped by at the neighborhood bookstore and picked up two of Chitra’s novels. What better time to indulge in some good literature.

The next morning when I turned on my computer, the name “Divakaruni” flashed in my email inbox. I stared in disbelief. I knew no other Divakaruni and Chitra had no reason to know me. So who is this email from? I eagerly opened it.  

It was indeed from the one and only Chitra Divakaruni, congratulating me on my new position. She introduced herself as one of the professors in the famous Creative Writing program at the University of Houston. I remember calling my husband and telling him that it looks like the job has come with more perks than I had negotiated for.

For the past eight years, I have enjoyed Chitra’s writings with additional familiarity. Chitra’s characters either live in India or have migrated from India and have the power to take me on journeys that are familiar and unpredictable at the same time. Her characters are easy to like—they are Indians…they are women…and they are strong!  

Before We Visit the Goddess is a multigenerational story of women in an Indian family. Sabitri, the grandmother, lives in India keenly aware of the many miles that separate her from her family in America. Bela, the mother, migrates to America under dubious circumstances and experiences the hardships most Indians coming to America to study or work are unfamiliar with. Tara, the daughter, is born and brought up in America and faces all the confusion that can surround the first generation of Indian-Americans. All three experience the complex emotions of “falling in love” and “falling out of love” with equal intensity and pain. All three lean on someone – someone outside the family – during tough times, but in the end each one discovers her own unique identity, an identity that is hers and hers alone.

What a powerful piece of literature from a wonderfully humble author! And she is part of our family, a member of the University of Houston faculty! Our Creative Writing Program is one of the best in the nation, and we know why.

Chitra has won multiple awards for her work and each one is a tribute to her extraordinary talent. But for me, she is a friend and an author whose books continue to open a window to the world, except now the world I see is the world that I have left behind, a world that remains as real as my own identity. And that sense of exhilaration remains as strong as ever.

The best diamond necklace I ever had…

…was the one I never saw.

Last month, my husband, Suresh, and I found ourselves at a fundraising charity gala. As the keynote speaker, I was particularly busy exchanging greetings, shaking hands and returning smiles – so I never made it to the auction table. I do so many of these galas that they often become just one more night to support a good cause.

But not this one!

As the announcer pleaded for people to purchase raffle tickets, I nudged Suresh to buy one. He made some small talk to the woman selling the tickets, took a look at the diamond necklace up for raffle, and handed her money for five tickets (obviously, he became enamored either with the seller or the necklace).

When the raffle time came, I saw Suresh in somewhat of a panic.

“Oh, where did I put those tickets?” he said, mumbling and searching frantically in his pockets. He pulled out my lipstick from one pocket and my cellphone from the other but no sign of tickets. Finally, he gave up, “I think I lost them. Well, I have never won anything anyway.” But at the last minute as the winning ticket was being drawn out of the jar, Suresh found his tickets neatly tucked inside his program.

2…1…8…7…6…9…9”…came the announcement followed by the loudest gasp I ever heard.

Suresh was instantly up on his feet, “It is me…my number…I never win anything.” Amid all the applause, he walked proudly to the stage to receive his sparkling prize. With the winning grin, he held the box containing the diamond necklace in his hands, admired it for a few seconds and then turned his head and looked at me. I was shaking my head in disbelief.

The next thing the audience heard on the microphone was Suresh’s voice, “My wife does not need diamonds so I would like to auction it off to raise more funds for the gala.” (While his statement about my not needing diamonds was certainly true, it would have been a lie had he declared, “My wife does not LIKE diamonds!”)

Suresh’s offer brought long, loud applause then the announcer turned into an impromptu auctioneer. Hands went up quickly, for there were a number of really generous people in the audience. At the end, the necklace raised more funds than its stated value. Suresh graciously handed over the necklace to the highest bidder and returned to his seat so incredibly happy.

He bent over and said softly in my ear, “You like to wear that UH championship pendant anyway, and I like you in that.” We both smiled.

This was another example why I believe that “Behind every successful woman is a SECURE man!” It may be her father, brother, husband, son or friend…but whoever he is, he has the inner strength to believe in her, to support her dreams with rock-solid confidence and to lift her spirits with just the right words. Here is to those men in our lives!!